Primary Insomnia Tied to Brain Neurochemical Imbalance

Adults with primary insomnia have a specific neurochemical imbalance that makes it more difficult for their brains to settle down for sleep, a new study says.
People with primary insomnia for more than six months have 30 percent less gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a chemical that slows overall activity in many brain areas, according to the report in the Nov. 1 issue ofSleep. A “racing mind” and an inability to shut down at night is a common complaint of people with primary insomnia.
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